Gubi

GRACE
rattan lounge chair

design
Tove Kindt-Larsen, 1936

The Grace rattan lounge chair comes from a conceptual sketch that Danish architect and designer Tove Kindt-Larsen (born Reddersen, 1906-1994) drew in 1936 and which was recently discovered in an archived record of his jewelry designs. Gubi brought it to life along with the Tove Kindt-Larsen family.

Its curvaceous organic frame accommodates a thick seat cushion, complemented by a loose, soft pillow. It is hand braided from the natural material by Indonesian artisans.

Jacob Gubi, propriétaire et directeur créatif de Gubi : « I was fascinated by the timeless simplicity and elegance of this design – as well as the opportunity it presented to explore a material new to the GUBI Collection. Its ‘indoor-outdoor’ aesthetic is fresh and new, while its form and aesthetic interact with the wider GUBI Collection in a really interesting way. » 


Dimensions L80 x P75 x H74 cm – Seat height 45 cm – Seat depth 60 cm – Seat width 65 cm

Ready-made Grace
from 1221 €

Customize your Grace
from 1153 €

> fabrics & leathers

Rattans are lianas – long- stemmed rooted vines that rely on trees and other foliage for their structural support.

80% of the world's rattan resources grow in Indonesia, where GUBI’s rattan furniture is made. By producing so close to the material’s source, GUBI is able to utilize local craftsmanship and work with traditional artisans with generations of experience in processing and weaving rattan.

It’s flexibility and durability have made it a popular material with furniture makers for millennia.

Rattan stems regenerate every five to seven years, making rattan one of the world’s fastest-growing natural materials. This rapid growth, combined with the longevity of the material – a carefully constructed rattan chair can last for over a century – make this a very sustainable choice.

Genuine rattan will acquire an attractive patina as it ages, resulting in timeless furniture that lasts for generations.

Tove Kindt-Larsen

Tove Kindt-Larsen (1906-1994) is best known for working with her husband, Edvard Kindt- Larsen, and for the global impact the pair made as part of the mid-century Danish design movement, but her own influence should not be underestimated.

She was an early pioneer in rattan chairs and was already recognized for her award-winning wicker furniture by the time they met. An architect by training, she also studied furniture design at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen, under the ‘godfather of Danish design’ Kaare Klint, before establishing a joint studio with Edvard in 1945.