Flos


OK Pendant

design Konstantin Grcic, 2014

Evolution of an industrial design icon ... With the OK Pendant, the German designer Konstantin Grcic delivers a futuristic interpretation of one of the historical models of Flos: Parentesi (1971) by Achille Castiglioni and Pio Manzù. Revolutionary for the time, this totally mobile lamp won the "Compasso d'Oro" in 1979. 

The OK lamp is an hommage to the original idea of Parentesi: "create a light source that slides vertically from floor to ceiling and rotates 360 ° on its axis". 

The incandescent bulb of Parentesi has been replaced by a high-tech, ultra-thin LED panel that provides functional and glare-free lighting. This disk-diffuser mounted on a painted metal body is rotatable 360° and pivots on its axis. It slides from floor to ceiling along a steel wire. The steel wire (not electrified) is fixed to the ceiling thanks to a painted metal rosette. On the ground, a counter weight ensures a perfect stability. The varnished metal body is provided with a long black electric cable (L 400 cm) with a normal wall plug.

The Ok lamp is thus free from the electrical stress of a ceiling pendant since it simply plugs into a socket on the ground. 

The OK lamp received the prestigious 2016 Compasso d'Oro Award, in the category "object presenting the evolution of an iconic product while maintaining traditional elegance"

Materials head in die-cast aluminum, lacquered or chrome-plated. Structure in PA66 covered with extruded aluminum. Steel cable stretched between the ceiling and the floor (length 4 m)

Light source 1 x EDGE LIGHTING, Dimmer 2700K

OK pendant

black, white or yellow
600 > 540 €

OK black

OK white

OK yellow

Konstantin Grcic

Born in Munich in 1965, Konstantin Grcic trained as a cabinetmaker before studying design at the Royal College of Art in London. There he meets Jasper Morrison and Vico Magistretti who will influence his work throughout his career. After graduating, he joined Jasper Morrison's studio and in 1991 founded his own studio in Munich: Konstantin Grcic, Industrial Design (KGID). He works there for prestigious publishers (IIttala, Magis, Moroso, Flos ...) as well as for industrialists (Krups, Whirlpool).

Grcic favors a functionalist approach to design: he calls his style "current, feasible and concrete". His creations have a radical, raw side. Some of Grcic's creations are part of the collections of the MoM and the Museum of Decorative Arts. He has also been awarded a Compasso d'oro for the Mayday Lamp and the Myto chair.