Riihitie

plant pots

design Aino Aalto, 1937

The Riihitie Plant Pot never went into serial production despite the fact they featured in the Artek presentation at the Paris World Fair in 1937. They have been designed by Aino Aalto and used on the terrace of home the Aalto builded on Helsinki's Riihitie Road in 1934-36. The house served both as a family home and an office, where the Aalto created the work that would change the course of modern architecture and furniture design.

 The house was lived in by the family until the 1990's. Today, it's a museum where visitors can see the Aaltos' design philosophy embodied in their much-loved family home. While many details speak of functionalism – the windows, flat roof, and the bare simplicity of the exterior – warmth and cosiness are expressed in the abundant use of wood, slare and brick.

 Two plan pots sits on the large south-facing terrace. Designed by Aino Aalto for the family home, they are further testimony to the Aaltos' affinity with nature and natural materials, and their belief that the small details are equally worthy of our time and attention. Artek introduces the plant pots in both original shapes. The ceramic pots are handcrafted, the choice of material inspired by the tiles Alvar Aalto incorporated into many of his buildings. Reinterpreted in three sizes for indoor use, the plant pots are available in light grey, dark brown, white and blue, colours sourced from ceramic tiles on display at the Experimental House, the Aaltos' summer retreat on the Finnish island of Muuratsalo.

Small B H12 x 19 x 16 cm

Small A H12 x 20,5 x 16 cm

Medium B H16 x 28 x 23 cm

Large A H20 x 40 x 27 cm

White
68 €

White
68 €

White
104 €

White
150 €

Blue
68 €

Blue
68 €

Blue
104 €

Blue
150 €

Light grey
68 €

Light grey
68 €

Light grey
104 €

Light grey
150 €

Aino Aalto

Aino Aalto (born Aino Mandelin-Marsio, 1894-1949) was a pioneer of Finnish design. Born in Helsinki, Finland, she received her architecture degree in 1920 from Helsinki Polytechnic. In 1924, Aino joined famed Finnish architect Alvar Aalto’s firm. That step proved fateful for Aino Aalto both professionally and personally when she soon married Alvar Aalto, creating a lifelong partnership. The couple worked closely until Aino Aalto’s death, collaborating on several projects that have left a significant mark on global design.

Independently from her husband, Aino Aalto is also known for her own individual contributions which helped bring modern Finnish design to the international arena. Her architectural exhibitions for Artek received the Gran Prix at the 1936 Milan Triennial. Aino Aalto also won the gold medal at the same competition for her “Aalto Glasses” which were inspired by the circles created by throwing rocks in the water. Eighty years later, the versatile, stackable “Aino Aalto” glassware continues to be a timeless classic for Iittala. Aino Aalto also designed buildings, interiors, furniture and textiles.