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Marimekko

Tiiliskivi & Suvi collection
fall 2020

design Armi Ratia, 1952 / Fujiwo Ishimoto, 1977

The Tiiliskivi (brick) pattern was designed by Marimekko’s founder Armi Ratia. The pattern reflects her belief in the simple beauty of everyday life.

Suvi (summer), inspired by folk art, is a typical example of the stylized flower- and plantthemed patterns designed by Fujiwo Ishimoto. Nature with its myriad phenomena has always been the most important source of inspiration for Ishimoto. 

fabrics

Fabrics are sold by the decimetre (1 metre = 10 decimetres).
For example, If you need 2.2 m, choose 22 units. Width 145 cm 

Printed in Finland

Tiiliskivi
100% linen
repeat 73 cm
6.20 > 5.21 € 

Suvi
100% cotton
repeat 88 cm
4.30 > 3.61 € 

cushion covers

cushion cover
100% cotton
40 x 40 cm
34 > 28,56 € 

cushion cover
100% cotton
45 x 45 cm
34 > 28,56 € 

picnic quilt & blanket

picnic quilt
160 x 145 cm
100% upholstery cotton + leather
SOLD OUT

quilted blanket
100% cotton + polyester
145 x 180 cm
SOLD OUT

tote bag

tote bag
100% cotton
44 x 43 cm
34 > 28,56 € 

tote bag
100% cotton
44 x 43 cm
34 > 28,56 € 

Armi Ratia

Armi Ratia (1912-1979) was born in Pälkjärvi in Karelia - now part of Russia. Her father owned a small grocery store and her mother worked as a grade school teacher. She studied in Helsinki and graduated as a textile designer in 1935. That same year, she got married to Viljo Ratia.

In 1949, Armi took the first steps to creating Marimekko. She joined Printex, her husband's oilcloth and print fabric company, and she started buying exceptionally colourful and bold patterns for the company. Marimekko was founded two years later, when Armi and Viljo began making clothes from Printex's unique fabrics. For a nation struggling with scarcity and greyness after the Second World War, Marimekko was a welcome source of colour and joy.

At Marimekko, Armi Ratia was a textile artist, managing director, creative director, wizard of words, publicity guru, and wellspring of inspiration. She had an incredible ability to decipher the mood of the times and sense future trends. She also had a genius for recognising talent and finding ways to realise even the wildest, most imaginative ideas.

Even today, Marimekko's success owes much to Armi's ideas. She was a trailblazer who made Marimekko a way of life, an attitude, a phenomenon embracing the everyday and the extraordinary.